Livestreamer without commandline

Update: Livestreamer has been discontinued and has bin replaced by StreamLink. So everytime I mention livestreamer just imagine I’m talking about StreamLink. It’s a fork of it and works exactly the same.

Now that my adventures on linux are over for a while I realized that some things are a lot harder on windows than on linux. For example: I use livestreamer (Now Stream Link) to watch livestreams in VLC.

VLC playing a livesteam over livestreamer

Originally because I wanted to avoid the Flash player and now that almost everyone has switched to HTML5 I use it only for convenience. On linux I started livestreamer like this:

$ livestreamer high & disown

Which allowed me to close the command line afterwards. Sadly windows doesn’t work that way so I always have to leave the cmd window open. But when something’s annoying enough I’ll fix it at some point and with this problem it’s possible over a *.vbs script.

This is the script I’m using (pastebin.com):

Dim streamer
Dim quality
Dim link

streamingSite = “twitch.tv”       ‘ The Site you want to grab the stream from
default       = “gamesdonequick”  ‘ The stream that is shown by default in the text box
defaultq      = “high”              ‘ The default quality

streamer = InputBox(“Enter livestream channel”, “livestreamer”, default)
quality  = InputBox(“Enter quality”, “livestreamer”, “high”)

link = “livestreamer ” & streamingSite & “/” & streamer & ” ” & quality & ”  –http-header Client-ID=jzkbprff40iqj646a697cyrvl0zt2m6″

CreateObject(“Wscript.Shell”).Run link,0,True
Set objShell = Nothing

Just save it as a *.vbs file and change the three variables to fit your needs and when launching it you should see this:

After clicking ok on the second dialog it’ll take some time, and if Livestreamer is installed correctly and finds a player (eg. VLC) you should see the player opening with the livestream and no command line. The last thing I did was make a shortcut of it and give it a nice icon.

Windows 10

So I have avoided windows 10 ever since the tray icon showed up for everyone for the free upgrade. The furthest I’ve gone away from windows 7 was 8.1. Since my windows 7 installation was getting kinda slow I decided to make a clean installation, and while I’m at it I thought I’ll go ahead and, for the first time, install windows 10 outside of a virtual machine.

The installation went smooth and I only had to untick about 300 settings about “collecting data to improve my experience”. After the main installation I went ahead and ran a few scripts to disable the rest of the services and I think I now a have a relatively useable installation of windows 10. So after I installed the basic software I need (which I heard can be automated using ninite or allmyapps, but I haven’t tried them) I went ahead and looked at some customisation with designs. There were some pretty cool looking ones but sadly one of them ended up toasting windows and trying to fix it only made it worse. Luckily I made a backup so that helped out a lot.

So after almost loosing my first installation of windows 10 about 2 hours in I stopped with the designs and installed something I knew from windows 8.1: Classic Shell, the free StartIsBack. It gives you a way to customize (or for windows 8 bring it back) your startmenu. The windows 10 start menu is way to big and full of useless stuff in my opinion so with classic shell you’ll get back the windows 7 styled start menu with a skin to fit the flat design of windows 10. It’ll also give you the search bar back and it’ll adjust to the accent color.

Due to the roll back to the backup I lost some software I had already installed, including winamp which was my goto music player for a while now. So I thought I’d use ths opportunity to give foobar a try but quickly dropped it since I didn’t like the interface and installing skins didn’t really work for me. But while looking for skins I found out about AIMP. I’ve never heard of it but I found a cool skin for it and it offers a lot of customization while staying very light weight (at least in terms of RAM usage).

So this is what my current installation looks like:

Classic shell and AIMP with the ncmpcpp skin

That’s basically it. We’ll see how long I can stick with it until I get annoyed or maybe to my surprise I’ll actually stay who knows.